SALVATION & INSPIRATION
Don’t let evil defeat you, but defeat evil with good.

Catholic Culture: Inspiration for Salvation

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We preach Christ crucified, a scandal to people of the Old Covenant and folly to all other peoples
Definition and Scope of
Catholic Culture

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Don’t let evil defeat you, but defeat evil with good
Liturgy and culture









Wroclaw, Poland, the capital of Polish Silesia proud of its Roman Catholic past, present and future

SEDES SAPIENTIAE WRATISLAVIENSIS

Vocazione di san Matteo - Powołanie św. Mateusza  - The Calling of St. Matthew

Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, O.C.D. Roman Catholic nun, Virgin and Martyr
-
How Edith Stein, a rebellious Jewish girl raised in Wroclaw
became a saint patroness of Europe and of World Youth Day


Ślęża - Maryjna Góra Pokoju
Sleza - The Marian Mountain of Peace
Sleza - La Montagna Mariana della Pace
Sleza - Mariánská Hora Míru
Sleza - Die Marian Berg des Friedens
Слеза - Марийная Гора Мира

Stations of the Cross Droga Krzyżowa Křížová cesta Kreuzweg
Przełęcz Tąpadła - Szczyt Ślęży


The Multiannual Wroclaw Festival of Integrity of the Human Person. dedicated to St John Paul II
Motto: Time for Enlightenment in Europe




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salvation-inspiration.com

SALVATION & INSPIRATION
Catholic Culture: Inspiration for Salvation

Don’t let evil defeat you, but defeat evil with good.
Romans 12:21

Nie daj się zwyciężyć złu, ale zło dobrem zwyciężaj!
List do Rzymian 12:21


Page 7, Go to Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,   8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14


Jednym z filarów kultury katolickiej jest nauka społeczna kościoła.
One of the pillars of Catholic culture is the social doctrine of the church.

POST-SYNODAL APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION ECCLESIA IN AMERICA
 OF THE HOLY FATHER JOHN PAUL II TO THE BISHOPS, PRIESTS AND DEACONS,
MEN AND WOMEN RELIGIOUS, AND ALL THE LAY FAITHFUL
ON THE ENCOUNTER WITH THE LIVING JESUS CHRIST:
THE WAY TO CONVERSION,  COMMUNION AND SOLIDARITY IN AMERICA
January 22, 1999
INTRODUCTION

The globalization of solidarity

55 (...) By her social doctrine the Church makes an effective contribution to the issues presented by the current globalized economy. Her moral vision in this area “rests on the threefold cornerstone of human dignity, solidarity and subsidiarity”.  The globalized economy must be analyzed in the light of the principles of social justice, respecting the preferential option for the poor who must be allowed to take their place in such an economy, and the requirements of the international common good. For “the Church's social doctrine is a moral vision which aims to encourage governments, institutions and private organizations to shape a future consonant with the dignity of every person. Within this perspective it is possible to examine questions of external debt, internal political corruption and discrimination both within and between nations”.

The Church in America is called not only to promote greater integration between nations, thus helping to create an authentic globalized culture of solidarity, but also to cooperate with every legitimate means in reducing the negative effects of globalization, such as the domination of the powerful over the weak, especially in the economic sphere, and the loss of the values of local cultures in favor of a misconstrued homogenization.

ENCYCLICAL LETTER
DEUS CARITAS EST
OF THE SUPREME PONTIFF BENEDICT XVI
TO THE BISHOPS PRIESTS AND DEACONS MEN AND WOMEN RELIGIOUS
AND ALL THE LAY FAITHFUL ON CHRISTIAN LOVE

28. In order to define more accurately the relationship between the necessary commitment to justice and the ministry of charity, two fundamental situations need to be considered:


a) The just ordering of society and the State is a central responsibility of politics. As Augustine once said, a State which is not governed according to justice would be just a bunch of thieves: “Remota itaque iustitia quid sunt regna nisi magna latrocinia?”.[18] Fundamental to Christianity is the distinction between what belongs to Caesar and what belongs to God (cf. Mt 22:21), in other words, the distinction between Church and State, or, as the Second Vatican Council puts it, the autonomy of the temporal sphere.[19] The State may not impose religion, yet it must guarantee religious freedom and harmony between the followers of different religions. For her part, the Church, as the social expression of Christian faith, has a proper independence and is structured on the basis of her faith as a community which the State must recognize. The two spheres are distinct, yet always interrelated.

Justice is both the aim and the intrinsic criterion of all politics. Politics is more than a mere mechanism for defining the rules of public life: its origin and its goal are found in justice, which by its very nature has to do with ethics. The State must inevitably face the question of how justice can be achieved here and now. But this presupposes an even more radical question: what is justice? The problem is one of practical reason; but if reason is to be exercised properly, it must undergo constant purification, since it can never be completely free of the danger of a certain ethical blindness caused by the dazzling effect of power and special interests.

Here politics and faith meet. Faith by its specific nature is an encounter with the living God—an encounter opening up new horizons extending beyond the sphere of reason. But it is also a purifying force for reason itself. From God's standpoint, faith liberates reason from its blind spots and therefore helps it to be ever more fully itself. Faith enables reason to do its work more effectively and to see its proper object more clearly. This is where Catholic social doctrine has its place: it has no intention of giving the Church power over the State. Even less is it an attempt to impose on those who do not share the faith ways of thinking and modes of conduct proper to faith. Its aim is simply to help purify reason and to contribute, here and now, to the acknowledgment and attainment of what is just.

The Church's social teaching argues on the basis of reason and natural law, namely, on the basis of what is in accord with the nature of every human being. It recognizes that it is not the Church's responsibility to make this teaching prevail in political life. Rather, the Church wishes to help form consciences in political life and to stimulate greater insight into the authentic requirements of justice as well as greater readiness to act accordingly, even when this might involve conflict with situations of personal interest. Building a just social and civil order, wherein each person receives what is his or her due, is an essential task which every generation must take up anew. As a political task, this cannot be the Church's immediate responsibility. Yet, since it is also a most important human responsibility, the Church is duty-bound to offer, through the purification of reason and through ethical formation, her own specific contribution towards understanding the requirements of justice and achieving them politically.

The Church cannot and must not take upon herself the political battle to bring about the most just society possible. She cannot and must not replace the State. Yet at the same time she cannot and must not remain on the sidelines in the fight for justice. She has to play her part through rational argument and she has to reawaken the spiritual energy without which justice, which always demands sacrifice, cannot prevail and prosper. A just society must be the achievement of politics, not of the Church. Yet the promotion of justice through efforts to bring about openness of mind and will to the demands of the common good is something which concerns the Church deeply.